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Online Courses

Roycemore’s Upper School program strives to encourage, aid, and guide the student in recognizing and fulfilling his or her unique potential. Our curriculum is rooted in academic, personal, and social growth objectives to prepare students individually for academic success in college. Through our courses we encourage the creative exploration of cultural ideas with an understanding of their genesis and development. In the list below, we have provided online high school credit courses that are categorized according to our departments. 

Roycemore’s Upper School courses are year-long classes from August 25, 2020 to June 6, 2021, unless otherwise noted. 

English

More Information

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American Literature

Mondays, Wednesdays
12:40 p.m. – 2:00 p.m.
Fridays
10:20 a.m. – 11:05 a.m.

Level 3
One Year Course

This course is a chronological study of the development of literature in America through the examination of documents, poems, essays, short stories, novels, and plays from the late 1500s to the present. The Scarlet Letter, Huckleberry Finn, The Glass Menagerie, and The Great Gatsby are among the works studied. Formal papers, including a research paper in the second semester, and vocabulary study are other essential components of the class.

**Prerequisites: Successful completion of Level 1 OR Level 2, demonstration of required analytical writing skills and teacher recommendation.

AP English Literature and Composition

Mondays, Wednesdays
12:40 p.m. – 2:00 p.m.
Fridays
10:20 a.m. – 11:05 a.m.

OR

Mondays, Wednesdays
2:10 p.m. – 3:30 p.m.
Fridays
1:50 p.m. to 2:35 p.m.

Advanced Placement
One Year Course

This intensive course revolves around classics in literature, from William Shakespeare to Albert Camus. Daily reading assignments and frequent analytical writing will help students pose questions about literature and draw analogies among works studied. A final project is given in addition to the Advanced Placement Literature Examination.

***Prerequisites: A Level 3 course, demonstration of required analytical writing skills and teacher recommendation

Foundations of English

Mondays, Wednesdays
9:00 a.m. – 10:20 a.m.
Fridays
8:30 a.m. – 9:15 a.m.

Level 1
One Year Course

Foundations is a course which prepares students to read and write in their Upper School classes. The course is composed of an introduction to literary genres (narrative fiction, non-fiction, prose, poetry, drama), the development of unified paragraphs and essays, analysis of the elements of fiction, and the tightening of basic writing skills. Students will write a 4-5 page research paper.

**Required for all 9th graders

Novels and Nonfiction

Tuesdays, Thursdays
12:40 – 2:00 p.m.
Fridays
2:45 p.m. – 3:30 p.m.

Level 2
One Year Course

This course is the second in the two-year sequence that helps ground Roycemore students in the basics of literature. We will focus on three, full-length, challenging novels that explore different: authorial perspectives; themes; milieus. Success in this course will come with an engaged, serious, questioning approach to important pieces of literature. Texts include: Frankenstein; Passing; and, The Heart is a Lonely Hunter. Surrounding these seminal texts will be pieces of substantial non-fiction (book reviews, school district debates, historical analyses) that help ground the student in a particular novel’s context. One quarter will be devoted to a “debatable-question” research paper of approximately 1500-2000 words (6 – 8 pages).

**Prerequisite: Successful completion of Foundations of English (for full-time students or prior high school coursework in poetry, drama, and short stories, along with experience writing a research paper).

Traditional Chinese Literature

Mondays, Wednesdays
2:10 p.m. – 3:30 p.m.
Fridays 1:50 p.m. – 2:35 p.m.

Grades 11-12 (10th grade with recommendation)
One Year Course

This course is a survey of the various genres and works of Chinese literature from its beginnings through the Sòng Dynasty (960-1279). The class orientation is primarily chronological and will focus on the classical genres of poetry, philosophy, and historical prose. Assigned readings and their historical and social contexts will be explained in class lectures and/or in student presentations. In some sessions, students may view a film or other video material related to the topic to enhance their understanding. Particularly in notable cases, comparisons and/or contrasts will be made between Chinese and other literatures and cultures.

**Prerequisite: World History and one other literature course, preferably World Literature.

Math

Science

Algebra I

Tuesdays, Thursdays
10:35 a.m. – 11:55 a.m.
Fridays
11:15 a.m. – 12:00 p.m.

Grades 9-10
One Year Course

Algebra I contains all the concepts usually studied in a first year algebra course. The graphing and solving of linear and quadratic equations, factoring, operations involving rational expressions, coordinate graphing, and simplifying irrational expressions are included.

**Prerequisite: Pre-Algebra

Algebra II with Coordinate Geometry and Trigonometry

Mondays, Wednesdays
2:10 p.m. – 3:30 p.m.
Fridays
1:50 p.m. – 2:35 p.m.
OR
Tuesdays, Thursdays
9:00 a.m. – 10:20 a.m.
Fridays
12:55 p.m. 1:40 p.m.

Grades 9-12
One Year Course

This course follows Algebra I and Geometry and prepares students for further study in mathematics. Topics in algebra, coordinate geometry, sequences and series, functions, exponents, and logarithms are covered in-depth, along with an overview of trigonometry. The emphasis of this course is demonstrating mathematics’ usefulness by investigating real world applications.

**Prerequisites: Geometry and teacher recommendation

AP Calculus AB

Mondays, Wednesdays
9:00 a.m. – 10:20 a.m.
Fridays
8:30 a.m. – 9:15 a.m.

Grades 10-12
One Year Course

This course begins the study of calculus that students will often continue into college. AP Calculus AB is roughly equivalent to a first semester college calculus course devoted to topics in differential and integral calculus. The AP course covers topics in these areas, including concepts and skills of limits, derivatives, definite integrals, and the Fundamental Theorem of Calculus. The course teaches students to approach calculus concepts and problems when they are represented graphically, numerically, analytically, and verbally, and to make connections among these representations. Students learn how to use technology to help solve problems, experiment, interpret results, and support conclusions.

**Prerequisites: Pre-Calculus (passing the Roycemore Pre-Calculus exam) and teacher recommendation

AP Computer Science A

Tuesdays, Thursdays
12:40 p.m. – 2:00 p.m.
Fridays
2:45 p.m. – 3:30 p.m.

Grades 9-12
One Year Course

AP Computer Science A is equivalent to a first-semester, college-level course in computer science. It introduces students to computer science through programming. Fundamental topics in this course include the design of solutions to problems, the use of data structures to organize large sets of data, the development and implementation of algorithms to process data and discover new information, the analysis of potential solutions, and the ethical and social implications of computing systems. The course emphasizes object-oriented programming and design using the Java programming language.

**Prerequisite: High School Algebra course

Euclidean Geometry

Mondays, Wednesdays
12:40 p.m. – 2:00 p.m.
Fridays
10:20 a.m. – 11:05 a.m.

Grades 9-12
One Year Course

This course uses a classical approach to the study of the geometric figures in the world around us with the development of an understanding of deductive reasoning as applied to these figures. Students will learn how to analyze geometric problems and complete proofs.

**Prerequisites: Algebra I and teacher recommendation

Pre-Calculus

Mondays, Wednesdays
10:35 a.m. – 11:55 a.m.
Fridays
9:25 a.m. – 10:10 a.m.

Grades 9-12
One Year Course

This course is designed to prepare students for success in college level Calculus. Topics include graphing of elementary functions and conic sections, exponents and logarithms, vectors and determinants, with strong emphasis on trigonometry. The course is intended for students with a strong mathematical aptitude and interest. The use of the graphing calculator throughout this course will prepare students for participation in a technological society.

**Prerequisites: Algebra II and teacher recommendation

Anatomy & Physiology

Mondays, Wednesdays
9:00 a.m. – 10:20 a.m.
Fridays
8:30 a.m. – 9:15 a.m.

Grades 10-12
One Year Course

This class is designed for students looking to more deeply explore the areas of anatomy and physiology. This class has a strong emphasis on experiments. Students must have strong science skills, including successful completion of Biology.

**Prerequisites: Biology and teacher recommendation

AP Chemistry

Mondays, Wednesdays
2:10 p.m. – 3:30 p.m.
Tuesdays, Thursdays
10:35 a.m. – 11:55 a.m.
Fridays
1:50 p.m. – 2:35 p.m.

Grades 10-12
One Year Course

This Advanced Placement course will prepare students for the AP test by looking at the various chemistry concepts covered on that exam. Topics include chemical principles and reactions, equilibrium, stoichiometry, and more. This class will help prepare students for college level classes in the chemistry field.

**Prerequisites: Algebra II, Chemistry and teacher recommendation

AP Physics C

Mondays, Wednesdays
2:10 p.m. – 3:30 p.m.
Tuesdays, Thursdays
9:00 a.m. – 10:20 a.m.
Fridays
12:55 p.m. – 2:35 p.m.

Grades 9-12
One Year Course

AP Physics C is a calculus-based physics class equivalent to the first-year of a college-level physics course for science and engineering majors. Students cultivate their understanding of physics through classroom study and activities as well as hands-on laboratory work. The course prepares students to take two AP exams. “AP Physics C: Mechanics” is the first-semester class that explores concepts like change, force interactions, fields, and conservation. Specific topics covered include kinematics; Newton’s laws of motion; conservation of energy; systems of particles and linear momentum; rotation; oscillations; and gravitation. “AP Physics C: Electricity and Magnetism” is the second-semester and explores topics such as electrostatics; conductors, capacitors, and dielectrics; electric circuits; magnetic fields; and electromagnetism. Introductory differential and integral calculus is used throughout the course.

**Prerequisite: Either currently enrolled in or completion of calculus.

Biology

Mondays, Wednesdays
10:35 a.m. – 11:55 a.m.
Fridays
9:25 a.m. – 10:10 a.m.

Grades 9-12
One Year Course

This course is an experiment-based approach to the major theories of biology. Students will learn to analyze information and apply biological theories. Freshmen may take this course if they demonstrate strong language skills and an aptitude for science.

**Prerequisite: Either currently enrolled in or completion of Algebra I. Teacher recommendation

Biomechanics

Mondays, Wednesdays
12:40 p.m. – 2:00 p.m.
Fridays
10:20 a.m. – 11:05 a.m.

Grades 9-12
One Year Course

There is increasing awareness and appreciation of biological organisms as rich sources for mimicry and inspiration in engineering design. This course provides students with a fundamental understanding of the principles of animal locomotion. Examples and exercises from a diverse array of walkers, runners, hoppers, jumpers, climbers, crawlers, burrowers, fliers, swimmers, and jetters are used to extract the general principles underlying the kinematics, dynamics, energetics, and control of locomotion. Since the largest animals are more than 100 million times larger than the smallest, the effects of body size on biomechanics are discussed. This course explores how nature has solved problems of movement to produce a diverse array of locomotor styles that match form and function. There is great interest in applying principles of biological design for engineering purposes, but a designer first must understand how organisms work. This course provides this knowledge.

**Prerequisite: Either currently enrolled in or completion of Algebra I.

Chemistry

Tuesdays, Thursdays
12:40 p.m. – 2:00 p.m.
Fridays
2:45 p.m. – 3:30 p.m.

Grades 9-12
One Year Course

This course is an introduction to the major principles and theories of chemistry. Whenever possible, chemical theories are developed on the basis of experimental data collected by the student. An understanding of basic algebra is essential. Students will be expected to learn how to use this knowledge for problem solving and chemical calculations. The course will cover basic chemical principles, chemical reactions, stoichiometry, gas laws, chemical bonding, thermodynamics, reaction rates, chemical equilibrium, and acid/base chemistry. Strong math skills beyond Algebra I are needed.

**Prerequisite: Either currently enrolled in or completion of Algebra II. Teacher recommendation

Introduction to Engineering

Times and days that this class meets are to be posted soon.

Mondays and Wednesdays
9:00 a.m. – 10:20 a.m.
Fridays
8:30 a.m. – 9:15 a.m.

Grades 9-12
One Year Course

Introduction to Engineering provides students first hand experience in discovering what it means to be an engineer. Students will practice documenting, modeling, drafting, and designing to solve everyday engineering challenges. Through this course, students will walk through the design cycle of engineering while applying their previous knowledge in both mathematics and science. Students will compete in multiple projects, reflect on their outcomes, and iterate on their results. Would you like to “make” a difference in the world around?

** Prerequisite: Either concurrently enrolled in or completion of Algebra I.

Physics

Mondays, Wednesdays
10:35 a.m. – 11:55 a.m.
Fridays
9:25 a.m. – 10:10 a.m.

Grades 9-12
One Year Course

Physics focuses mostly on qualitative explanations of the natural world. Topics in the traditional physics canon, such as mechanics, conservation laws, ray optics, and waves, will be surveyed. In addition to physics concepts and the necessary equations, several themes will be covered in the course, such as the wonder of the natural world, the role of science in life and society, how the discipline of science operates in practice, and the interdisciplinary nature of science as a whole. The class consists of lectures, laboratories, laboratory reports, demonstrations, homework assignments, and in-class problem solving. With a conceptual foundation, students experience using math as the language of physics in order to support problem solving. Students will learn how to write lab reports based on laboratory activities and class demonstrations.

**Prerequisite: Either currently enrolled in or completion of Algebra 1.

Social Studies

World Language

America in Vietnam

Tuesdays, Thursdays
12:40 p.m. – 2:00 p.m.
Fridays
2:45 p.m. – 3:30 p.m.

Grades 10-12
First Semester Course
(Aug. 25th – Dec. 18th, 2020)

The course will begin with an overview of Vietnamese history, particularly as it relates to conflicts in the region historically. We will also briefly examine French colonialism in Indochina. We will begin exploring American involvement in Vietnam with Ho Chi Minh’s appearance at the Versailles Conference, French efforts to restore colonial control after WW II, American Involvement in the Geneva Conference in 1954 and then growing American involvement from 1957 to 1975. Principle focus will be on exploring stated American interests in Southeast Asia, formation of policy and conduct of the war. Reading will be at an upper division college level

**Prerequisite: AP US History

AP European History

Tuesdays, Thursdays
12:40 p.m. – 2:00 p.m.
Fridays
2:45 p.m. – 3:30 p.m.

Grades 10-12
One Year Course

The AP European History course focuses on developing students’ understanding of European history from approximately 1450 to the present. The course has students investigate the content of European history for significant events, individuals, developments, and processes in four historical periods, and develop and use the same thinking skills and methods—analyzing primary and secondary sources, making historical comparisons, chronological reasoning, and argumentation—employed by historians when they study the past. The course also provides five themes—interaction of Europe and the world; poverty and prosperity; objective knowledge and subjective visions; states and other institutions of power; and individual and society—that students explore throughout the course in order to make connections among historical developments in different times and places. Qualified students may take AP European History in lieu of non-AP Modern European History, but may not take both.

**Prerequisites: World History, enrollment in English Level 3 or higher, and teacher recommendation

AP Psychology

Tuesdays, Thursdays
10:35 a.m. – 11:55 a.m.
Fridays
11:15 a.m. – 12:00 p.m.

Grades 10-12
One Year Course

AP Psychology is designed to introduce students to the systematic and scientific study of the behavior and mental processes of human beings and other animals. The course is designed to offer students a college level experience in order to prepare them for the College Board exam. While considering the psychologists and studies that have shaped the field, students explore and apply psychological theories, key concepts, and phenomena associated with such topics as the biological bases of behavior, sensation and perception, learning and cognition, motivation, developmental psychology, testing and individual differences, treatment of abnormal behavior, and social psychology. Throughout the course, students employ psychological research methods, including ethical considerations, as they use the scientific method, evaluate claims and evidence, and effectively communicate ideas.

** Prerequisites: World History, enrollment in English Level 3 or higher, and teacher recommendation

AP United States History

Mondays, Wednesdays
9:00 a.m. – 10:20 a.m.
Fridays
8:30 a.m. – 9:15 a.m.

Grades 10-12
One Year Course

The AP US History course focuses on developing students’ understanding of American history from approximately 1491 to the present. The course has students investigate the content of US history for significant events, individuals, developments, and processes in nine historical periods, and develop and use the same thinking skills and methods—analyzing primary and secondary sources, making historical comparisons, chronological reasoning, and argumentation—employed by historians when they study the past. The course also provides seven themes—American and national identity; migration and settlement; politics and power; work, exchange, and technology; America in the world; geography and the environment; and culture and society—that students explore throughout the course in order to make connections among historical developments in different times and places. Qualified students may take AP US History in lieu of non-AP US History, but may not take both. Successful completion of the US and Illinois Constitution test is a requirement for this class.

**Prerequisites: World History, enrollment in English Level 3 or higher, and teacher recommendation

Consumer Education

Tuesdays, Thursdays
9:00 a.m. – 10:20 a.m.
Fridays
12:55 p.m. – 1:40 p.m.

Grades 10-12
Second Semester Course
(Jan. 19th – Jun. 2nd, 2021)

This course offers a learning opportunity for students to gain basic knowledge of consumer issues. The areas of study will include consumer rights and responsibilities, consumer protection, comparison-shopping, budgeting, saving, investing, banking, credit, housing, automobiles, insurance, and taxes.

Cultural Anthropology

Mondays, Wednesdays,
10:35 a.m. – 11:55 a.m.
Fridays
9:25 a.m. – 10:10 a.m.

Level 3 Course
Second Semester Course
(Jan. 19th – Jun. 2nd, 2021)

This course will examine the effects of cultural, geographical, environmental, and behavioral factors on the development of humankind. Study will include the cultures of Africa, South America, North America—including Native Americans, Asia and Europe. Emphasis will be placed on discussion, reading, writing and research skills.

Developmental Psychology

Tuesdays, Thursdays
9:00 a.m. – 10:20 a.m.
Fridays
12:55 p.m. – 1:40 p.m.

Grades 10-12
First Semester Course
(Aug. 25th – Dec. 18th, 2020)

Developmental psychology is a one-semester course that will introduce students to the study of human development from conception through old age. The course will highlight a psychosocial framework that emphasizes the role of genetic, maturational, societal, and self-directed factors in development.

Geography

Mondays, Wednesdays,
10:35 a.m. – 11:55 a.m.
Fridays
9:25 a.m. – 10:10 a.m.

Grades 10-12
First Semester Course
(Aug. 25th – Dec. 18th, 2020)

In the study of geography, students utilize physical and cultural perspectives to examine people, places, and environments at local, regional, national, and international levels. Students describe the influence of geography on the events of the past and present with emphasis on contemporary issues. A significant portion of the course centers around the physical processes that shape patterns in the physical environment; the characteristics of major landforms, climates, and ecosystems and interrelationships; the political, economic, and social processes that shape cultural patterns of regions; types and patterns of settlement; the distribution of movement of world population; relationships among people, places, and environments; and the concept of religion. Students analyze how location affects economic activities in different economic systems. Students identify the processes that influence the world’s political divisions and they analyze how different points of view affect the development of public policies. Students compare how components of culture shape the regional characteristics and analyze the impact of technology and human modifications on the physical environment. Students use problem-solving and decision-making skills to ask and answer geographic questions.

**Prerequisite: World History or equivalent.

Modern European History

Fridays
11:15 a.m. – 12:00 p.m.

Grades 10-12
One Year Course

This course is a traditional study of modern European history beginning with the Renaissance and ending with recent times. The first semester will cover the Renaissance, the Reformation, Exploration, Absolutism, the Scientific Revolution, the Enlightenment, and the French Revolution. The second semester will cover the Industrial Revolution, the rise of nationalism, World War I, the rise of dictatorships, World War II, the Cold War, the Revolutions of 1989, and the building of a new Europe. Emphasis is placed on reading, writing, and research skills. During the year students will engage in a variety of activities including cooperative groups, research projects, the study of primary documents, and discussions about current events in Europe.

**Prerequisite: World History.

Philosophy

Mondays, Wednesdays
10:35 a.m. – 11:55 a.m.
Fridays
9:25 a.m. – 10:10 a.m.

Grades 11-12 (10th grade students with teacher recommendation)
One Year Course

Students will develop their critical thinking skills through participating in the creation of a reflective community of inquiry, examining some of the central questions of human existence, and discussing the seminal ideas of a number of important thinkers from around the world. Course content will be conveyed through short reading selections. Connections with contemporary popular culture will also be explored through a variety of means such as films, novels, comic books/graphic novels, and/or songs.

** Prerequisite: World History and one other social studies course.

United States History

Mondays, Wednesdays
10:35 a.m. – 11:55 a.m.
Fridays
9:25 a.m. – 10:10 a.m.

Grades 10-12
One Year Course

This course is designed to expose students to concepts as well as facts and figures about the history of the United States. First semester will cover the period from the 1400s to approximately 1870 and will include the following units: Settlement and Colonization, Independence, Development of Democracy, the Constitution, Manifest Destiny, Sectionalism, the Civil War, and Reconstruction. Second semester will cover the period from 1870 to the present and will include the following units: Industrialization, Expansionism, the Progressive Movement, World Wars I and II, the Depression, the New Deal, Domestic Challenges, and World Leadership. The approach is a chronological one and will use the various social sciences. Nightly reading assignments will provide the basis for daily discussion and class work. Successful completion of the US and Illinois Constitution test is a requirement for this class.

**Prerequisite: World History.

World History

Mondays, Wednesdays
2:10 p.m. – 3:30 p.m.
Fridays
1:50 p.m. – 2:35 p.m.

Grade 9
One Year Course

This course begins a study of history and how historians obtain their information. It then covers prehistory, origins of early man, the river civilizations, the classical civilizations of Greece and Rome, Medieval and Renaissance Europe, as well as the Far East and Africa. Emphasis is placed on developing the reading, writing, and research skills important in understanding history. The course is designed as a background and will provide a natural transition to Modern European History or United States History.

**Required for all 9th graders.

French I

Mondays, Wednesdays
10:35 a.m. – 11:55 a.m.
Fridays
9:25 a.m. – 10:10 a.m.

Grades 9-12
One Year Course

French I is an introductory course that focuses on basic structures and elementary vocabulary. Students practice speaking, listening, reading, and writing in French. The cultures of France and francophone nations are also examined.

French II

Tuesdays, Thursdays
9:00 a.m. – 10:20 a.m.
Fridays
12:55 p.m. – 1:40 p.m.

OR

Tuesdays, Thursdays
10:35 a.m. – 11:55 a.m.
Fridays
11:15 a.m. – 12:00 p.m.

Grades 9-12
One Year Course

In the second level of French, students review the fundamentals presented in the first year of study and extend their familiarity with important linguistic structures. Listening and speaking activities continue to be integral to each day’s work, and related tasks are components of every exam. Written, spoken, and listening exercises become longer and more sophisticated. Cultural information is presented in tandem with language studies.

**Prerequisites: French I and teacher recommendation

French III

Tuesdays, Thursdays
12:40 p.m. – 2:00 p.m.
Fridays
2:45 p.m. – 3:30 p.m.

Grades 9-12
One Year Course

At this level students encounter complex language structures and are required to master numerous verb tenses. They are encouraged to extend their reading and writing skills and to be able to speak with acceptable proficiency in a variety of situations relating to the units of study. Listening comprehension at this new level of sophistication is also fostered through the continued use of in-class listening and speaking activities. Reading skills are promoted through readings of increasing length and complexity.

**Prerequisites: French II and teacher recommendation.

French IV

Mondays, Wednesdays
2:10 p.m. – 3:30 p.m.

Grades 9-12
One Year Course

French IV reviews and expands upon all previously acquired material. The class uses a college level text to solidify students’ grasp of grammar and vocabulary. Speaking activities are more open-ended, requiring students to use the language in more realistic situations. Listening comprehension exercises are more challenging as well. Students examine diverse aspects of francophone cultures through readings and explore their personal interests through individual research and presentations on a variety of themes.

**Prerequisites: French III and teacher recommendation.

AP French Language & Culture

Mondays, Wednesdays
2:10 p.m. – 3:30 p.m.
Fridays
1:50 p.m. – 2:35 p.m.

Grades 11-12
One Year Course

This is an intensive course designed to prepare students for the AP examination. The class reviews grammatical structures using a text written entirely in French. They explore francophone cultures and current events by watching videos and using the Internet. They write essays, explore French literature, and create individual presentations. Students also complete advanced reading, writing, listening, and speaking exercises that replicate those found on the AP test.

**Prerequisites: French IV and teacher recommendation.

Mandarin I

Tuesdays, Thursdays
10:35 a.m. – 11:55 a.m.
Fridays
11:15 a.m. – 12:00 p.m.

Grades 9-12
One Year Course

Mandarin I is an introductory course that focuses on basic structures and elementary vocabulary. Students will learn the four basic skills at the first year level: speaking, listening, reading, and writing. The cultures of China and other Chinese-speaking nations are also examined.

Mandarin II

Tuesdays, Thursdays
10:35 a.m. – 11:55 a.m.
Fridays
11:15 a.m. – 12:00 p.m.

Grades 9-12
One Year Course

Mandarin II continues the program students began in Mandarin I. The second year builds on the basics of the language to incorporate more complex topics. Students will practice speaking, listening, reading, and writing in Mandarin.

** Prerequisites: Mandarin I and teacher recommendation

Mandarin III

Mondays, Wednesdays
12:20 p.m. – 2:00 p.m.
Fridays
10:20 a.m. – 11:05 a.m.

Grades 9-12
One Year Course

Continued development of competency in the four skills of language beyond the second year, in addition to the study of culture, history, literature, and art.

**Prerequisites: Mandarin II and teacher recommendation

Mandarin IV

Mondays, Wednesdays
12:20 p.m. – 2:00 p.m.
Fridays
10:20 a.m. – 11:05 a.m.

Grades 9-12
One Year Course

Continued development of competency in the four skills of language beyond the third year, in addition to the study of culture, history, literature, and art.

**Prerequisites: Mandarin III and teacher recommendation

Spanish I

Tuesdays, Thursdays
9:00 a.m. – 10:20 a.m.
Fridays
12:55 p.m. – 1:40 p.m.

Grades 9-12
One Year Course

Students are introduced to the pronunciation, simple verb structure, and vocabulary of the Spanish language. Conversation topics include school, weather, time, family, and recreation. Students also learn about Hispanic culture, holiday customs, and geography. They read various materials for language reinforcement and practice speaking daily in class.

Spanish II

Tuesdays, Thursdays
9:00 a.m. – 10:20 a.m.
Fridays
12:55 p.m. – 1:40 p.m.

Grades 9-12
One Year Course

Students study more complex grammar and vocabulary related to traveling, food, art, childhood, and health. They review the present tense and learn the preterite and imperfect tenses, reflexive verbs, and commands. Listening and speaking in the target language are practiced daily in class. We continue the study of Spanish culture and read short stories for language reinforcement.

**Prerequisites: Spanish I and teacher recommendation

Spanish III

Mondays, Wednesdays
12:40 p.m. – 2:00 p.m.
Fridays
10:20 a.m. – 11:05 a.m.

Grades 9-12
One Year Course

Third year students use acquired grammar and vocabulary in real life situations such as doing housework, discussing environmental issues, and giving directions. We learn the perfect tenses and the subjunctive and imperative moods. Students read short stories and poems and learn about the cultures of the Spanish speaking world in more depth. Students reinforce their writing skills with compositions and speaking skills through conversations in Spanish.

**Prerequisites: Spanish II and teacher recommendation

Spanish IV

Tuesdays, Thursdays
10:35 a.m. – 11:55 a.m.
Fridays
11:15 a.m. – 12:00 p.m.

Grades 9-12
One Year Course

Fourth year Spanish reviews previous grammatical structures and introduces all remaining ones. Students complete the En Español III textbook and study short stories through a supplemental reader. Students also view and analyze movies in the Spanish language. Students write compositions regularly to improve vocabulary use and writing skills. Speaking skills are enhanced through daily speaking and oral presentations in the target language.

**Prerequisites: Spanish III and teacher recommendation

AP Spanish Language & Culture

Tuesdays, Thursdays
10:35 a.m. – 11:55 a.m.
Fridays
11:15 a.m. – 12:00 p.m.

Grades 9-12
One Year Course

This course is an intensive review and continuation of Spanish IV. The primary goal is to prepare students for the Advanced Placement Examination in the Spanish language. We focus on advanced reading, writing, speaking, and listening components that replicate the conditions of the exam, in addition to a complete review of grammatical tenses and forms. Students continue to write essays, give oral presentations and read literature in Spanish.

**Prerequisites: Spanish IV and teacher recommendation

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